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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am trying really hard to give my R-15 a second chance as a hunting rifle before switching over to a bolt action gun. I started out by swapping out the grip with the Hogue grip from my SR-556. Great... new feel... love it! I also ordered the Nikon Coyote Special scope along with a new riser to help move it forward some. I just have a cheap Burris on it now and the eye relief is horrible, and not very clear either.

The next thing on my list is the trigger. I have a Thomson Center Encore with a < 2 lb (modified) trigger and I am in love with that thing. I really want my R-15 to snap like that bad boy. I have heard good things about Timney triggers and I think I am prepared to go that route but not sure which model to choose.

Any thoughts on the entire situation? Would love to hear them.

Thanks!
 

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Junior Member
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From what I have seen of Timney, they seem to run "hot and cold". I have had some that were quite crisp, but have had way more of them that had too much perceivable sear-engagement, (creep) I have sent several of them out that have been rejected by the customer.

You may want to look into getting a tuned Rock River trigger, or even a Jewell. The Jewell is adjustable, and can go from a safe, 4 pound winter hunting trigger, to a scary light load-development/varmint trigger and back again in less than a minute. You can get a Rock River tuned to be a fantastic trigger, but whatever level you have it tuned to is what you will have. You will not be able to change it back and forth like an adjustable trigger.

Timney is fighting with the fact that they are dealing with a semi-auto, and have to contend with a disconnector. Building a good single-stage trigger for a bolt-action rifle is a "walk in the park" compared to building a single-stage trigger for a semi-auto. The amount of sear-engagement a single-stage trigger has is simply the area that is available for the hammer to drop onto when released from the disconnector. If they leave enough "room" for the hammer to drop onto, then you will have that "creep" that is so objectionable in a trigger. If they make that area quite small, then the "creep" is at an acceptable level, but any wear in one of the many trigger parts can start giving you double-taps. There is a reason that the Timney, JP and AR Gold triggers are all "drop in". They did that not for the convenience of the customer, but to eliminate the possibility of worn pin-holes in the AR lower receiver causing them problems. Those "drop in" trigger boxes have steel bearings that will stay tight long after the pin-holes in an aluminum receiver are loose.

I was not a fan of two-stage triggers, but after trying different triggers in the AR's over the years, I have switched all of my AR's over to either the RR trigger or the Jewell.
 
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