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I see a lot of guys out west hunting predators from a 6' ladder. I have not been out west yet to hunt yet so I guess I don't really get it. Do they just not look up? How can this be an effective means of hunting?
 

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In the South West a ladder helps to see predators coming in when hunting in dense cover. The added height allows you to see over the brush.
 

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Kinda of hard to use shooting sticks or turn more than about 160 degrees on a ladder. I would think this would only be effective in thick brush and mostly with a shotgun. JMHO
 

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" In the South West a ladder helps to see predators coming in when hunting in dense cover. The added height allows you to see over the brush. " I dunno about Just using a ladder; but Ive used one to get in a tree stand , storage buildings, on top of my house, etc.. Ive had success using a ladder in conjuction with those because I get a better view of the land like gonefishn said.​
 

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guess i kinda pictured someone sitting in a ladder sticking up out of the brush like a sore thumb. as long as you're concealed i guess whatever works right?
 

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they are being used by hunters even in cotton fields.
in dense brush it does just that gets you above cover and thick brush.
lots of folks killin coyotes that way with shotguns it must be affective.
in Wyoming its not needed but i talk to real pro's at it on predator masters and they swear by it.
 

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When I was trapping and calling a large bird ranch some years ago, it was full of Russian Thistle trees, thick grease wood and heavy large sage brush, almost impossible to call in. Flat marshy areas with canals and ditchs you could not see being on the ground or even a foot or two high, was painfull, LOL

I used the russian thistles as a perch where I could but it always was a headache trying to see with the branchs. So I got me a tri legged archery stand that was about 8 foot tall and set it in front of the trees. I would set my speaker at the base of the stand or off to the side as far as the cord would reach, as at the time I was using a Johnny Stewart casstte caller, I owuld place the caller control in between my legs on the seat and keep the rifle ready, was a while to get me a system, But I drilled them dogs

Every thing change then, as I could see over the brush and notice all kinds of shooting lanes that one could not being down on the ground or half way up a tree in a crook.

Elevation is everything when dealing with brush with no hills or large trees to move up on. I would move the stand once a week to a different area of this ranch and then call for a week or so at different times of the day. It really made a difference in seeing dogs.

One should not count out a different method of another just cause they see no use for it, theres usually a reason for the trouble if you wait long enough for the whole story.
 

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Very nice advice gritguy. in southwest TX it is most common to call from an elevated stand in the back of a truck. Yep, they do see you but generally it is the last thing that they see. When we go out there we call at night from the truck. At first it felt weird but it is not a bad thing, just different. the truck is obviously turned off and usually two people are up in the perch. Much of the area has thick brush or mesquite. we set the caller out about 50 yards and get ready. of course this is legal on private property. even the pro guides/outfitters hunt this way.
 
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