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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Archery season opened a week ago and I finally decided to head out to see what's out there. Trail cams haven't shown much, but neighbor, Bucky, said he'd seen more than one good buck out back in the food plots of clover and brassicas. I took a stand facing a slight breeze from the southeast and temperature around 65 degrees and rain on the way. A very entertaining sit the entire two hours when this guy showed up. Had to wait for a good angle and zipped an arrow (bolt) clean through at 10 yards as it strolled in front of me following a group of does.
Trophy hunting Hunting Deer hunting Plant Deer
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, men! I had to go back to find the arrow, because I didn't want Bucky to "come across" it. It was about 20 yards beyond the site of the crime hiding in the foliage. I saw the light on the nock in flight but it wasn't visible afterward until I pulled the shaft loose from the earth. Still lit.

Temperature is still 65 degrees, so I must get the beast in a cooler today. It's iced down completely, so all is well.

Funny thing...Bucky, the land owner was watching the field, which covers about a quarter mile out his back patio door, when the action picked up in the rain. Little did he know I never take a phone out there when he texted this: 1) Looks like you have some company 2) Are you seeing the big boy? 3) Did you just shoot him?

When he didn't get an answer, he waited for me to pass by his house on the way out. Said he saw all the deer run away and didn't know what happened. He helped with the extraction by bringing his truck out there, while Bullwinkle came from home with his hound and some ice. No reason to use the dog. Deer piled up right in front of me about 60 yards away.

Just need a new broadhead (NAP expandable), because it got buggered up.

That's all the crossbow hunting 'till next year. Probably take a doe in December's firearm season, if the creek doesn't rise too much. Oh, yeah. I have a bridge now.
 

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Congrats Glen ! Nice buck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, men.

One thing I noticed when I found the killing arrow in the field. The NAP expandable broadhead did not deploy, as advertised. The mechanics of the broadhead are such that friction holds the blades in place in flight. When resistance is met (such as a deer) the blades are supposed to open widely with a swept-back design.

All blades were in a forward position never having opened up upon impact. This particular broadhead needed replacement, because it had become damaged, so I took out a new one and "tested" the force necessary to deploy the blades. It, too, seemed far too difficult to open properly.

I will be switching to a different broadhead for next season and welcome input. This is only the second deer taken with these broadheads and I never found the first broadhead after the kill - only the back half of that arrow, so I don't know if that broadhead deployed, either. Done with them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Check out this fawn. Never have I seen one this small this late in the season. My guess is that it will survive in our part of the state, but it sure is strange.
Vertebrate Grass Grazing Terrestrial animal Fawn
 

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Seen a set of twins a bit smaller in Dec. plowing snow, seen them throughout the winter, one survived I seen into April, predators were thick that winter.
 

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Story’s like yours on the brood head not deploying is why I still shoot fixed blade ones I’ve never had one let me down yet and have heard of many mechanicals not opening up good luck finding a replacement and that fawn is a small one for sure I’ve never seen one with the spots still that visible this late in the year
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've only taken two bucks with the NAP Spitfires and never found the front half of the arrow on the first one, so it could have had similar results not expanding. I recall years ago, when I bought them, the blades seemed easier - almost too easy - to manipulate back and forth and I always thought they were almost too loosely attached at the pivot point. I worried about them opening up in flight. Now, years later, they seem far too difficult to work by hand. I'm thinking years of being housed in the garage in the bow case has led to corrosion at the joint of the blades. Maybe all they need is a drop of lubricant.

I have a notion to contact NAP, or to lube the remaining lot, or toss them in the trash. One way or the other, something's gotta change before I take that rig afield again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I decided to write the manufacturer of the spitfire broadheads and here may be the answer to the issue of the broadhead deployment. Now, I'm still not sure, because the broadheads seem to take more effort by hand to open them than when I first purchased them years ago. Anyway, here's the FAQ post:
THERE SOMETHING WRONG WITH MY SPITFIRES? I'M CONCERNED THEY WON'T OPEN ON GAME.
This is the most asked question about Spitfires! Just like with a magician’s slight of hand, you’re not seeing the whole picture. The illusion is that the Spitfires didn’t open. The reality is that the Spitfires did open, but then closed. Spitfires are unlike any other mechanical broadhead in that they utilize internal retention clips that put side pressure on the blades to hold them closed. When the Spitfire is open, the blades are free-swinging. As the Spitfire is shot into a target or game animal, the blades open. It takes about 1 inch before the Spitfire fully expands in the target. As the arrow continues moving forward, the blades are constantly being pushed backward. However, as the arrow exits the back of the target or animal the backward pressure is eliminated. As the arrow slows and stops, the pressure on the blades reverses so the blades swing forward and close back into the ferrule slots. The retention clips once again hold the blades closed. So when you retrieve your arrows the Spitfires appear to never have opened. The blades may also close if stopped suddenly inside an animal, especially if the Spitfire hits solid bone or if the Spitfire stops in soft tissues or inter-tissue spaces. The closed broadhead conforms to state laws that outlaw barbed broadheads. Test this at home! Tape a sheet of paper to the back of the target and then shoot through the front using the Spitfire. The sheet of paper will indicate the full cutting width of the Spitfire expanded as it left the target. However, when you retrieve your arrow, the Spitfire will be closed.
 
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