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Timney trigger


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#1 Antlerz22

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 09:41 PM

Well this past deer season, had an eye opening event happen. Was in a tripod stand watching down the road in 2 directions from the bend in the road. A doe made the mistake of coming out apx 60 yards from me broadside. I got the gun on her, moved ahead to a spot to let her come into my crosshairs, as I don't ever follow and shoot. It creates too much movement not to mention, that very movement can cause a bad shot.

 

Anyway I pick my spot and just before she gets centered, I roll my safety off and BOOM....... the gun goes off without my finger on the trigger and blows up some pine straw right in front of her---she gets away of course. So then I open my bolt (a Remington 700) and capture the spent round. I then put it back on safe, put the fired brass back into battery and close the bolt. I then simply holding the rifle and nothing near the trigger---put the rifle on fire. As soon as I do it fires again, needless to say that ended my hunt.

 

But more importantly, I get this real uneasy feeling in my gut as to how many times before I had the opportunity to actually shoot that I had live rounds in the chamber and the safe on (of course) and around others in the field. Never when in camp is my rifle loaded, but just going through all the times in my mind as to "what if" a deer had jumped up if I was in the presence of fellow hunters, what possibly could have happened? It bothered me greatly, and my ONLY saving grace was years of trying to be gun safe. Its an endeavor we as hunters owe one another in close proximity especially and even when alone as I was.

 

It only takes one mistake with a rifle or any other firearm, to have a permanent life changing event. I was so relieved I was alone when that happened. It was then I went straight home and ordered me a Timney trigger. 

I ordered the one with the safety, vs one where I put my old safety on their trigger assembly. It was very sudden when it fires vs a smooth steady creep as I was used to with the old trigger. There is absolutely no creep, and when it reaches the set poundage, THEN the trigger moves and fires. It takes getting used to as personally I like a smooth predictable creep. Maybe Ill get used to it over time, as I've always had triggers (not just remingtons) that had SOME creep. The Timney is quite safe compared to what I had, overall I'm pleased with it but wont  give a 5 star rating just yet. I have yet to punch paper with it and reloads, but will soon enough.

 

It has produced venison for me however, the day after I got it installed. So that's a step in the right direction.

I'd like to close with some heartfelt words to those who will listen, please----before you put your weapon on fire, have it literally aimed at what you're fixing to shoot at. And as always---PRACTICE absolute muzzle safety at all times.


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#2 glenway

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 02:33 AM

Timney triggers are good and reliable.

 

Just wondering if you had not heard of the Remington recall on the model 700 trigger/safety issues.



#3 youngdon

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 07:08 AM

A good reminder on something we should all strive to be 100% on top of.


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#4 Antlerz22

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 11:43 AM

Timney triggers are good and reliable.

 

Just wondering if you had not heard of the Remington recall on the model 700 trigger/safety issues.

Yes I was aware and thought mine to be outside the recalls. I had previously used Remington crisp and one other method of setting my Remington trigger. The other method (not Remington crisp) I cant recall the article, but was very detailed and for me easy to understand. I adjusted my old trigger and found a sweet spot that worked flawlessly for years. I even-- once set safely--- J-B welded the screws used to adjust the trigger to ensure no backing out etc would occur. All that was still intact upon inspection after my incident. When I had found the point in adjustment where the gun would fire when jarred firmly by banging the butt on the carpeted floor with padding, I would then re-adjust the set screw until it wouldn't fire by banging the butt anymore and adding a quarter turn more in the safe direction.

So to the best of my reasoning, I'm going to contribute the eventual fail of the trigger, not on the adjustment necessarily, but the repeated use of many rounds and trigger pulls over the years. Specifically to the sear engagement surfaces which need to be sharp edged and unworn. I'm thinking the sear edges wore sufficiently to allow disengagement (firing) unpredictably. Repeated use over the years had finally taken its toll, not from my adjustments---but simple wear and tear IN MY CASE. Even though there were/is a recall on those triggers. I personally think its a flawed design as you don't hear of other manufacturers having the issue. So either the hardening of the sear surfaces wasn't good enough, or the friction allowed by design was too great for either repeated use, normal jarring occurring with gun handling in hunting situations ("tossing" gun into back seat of a truck etc---WHILE LOADED)  or things of like nature that has caused all the accidents etc. What can be said for 100% certain is, had every gun been handled properly--ie unloaded, or in the ready to fire (shouldered-aimed) position, then the accidents certainly wouldn't have been fatal or caused debilitating casualties.

Lastly the two surfaces of sear engagement where the edges engaged showed slight discoloration as in different from the surrounding metal coloration. Indicating to me even though it seemed almost indiscernible to my eyes---as maybe a reason for the (disengagement--firing). Sorry I might be getting a bit technical, but am just trying to rationalize it openly for discussion and from what my personal perceptions were based on what I just explained. Could be wrong---could be right, but either way it is my way of trying to get to the root cause of what actually happened, and to maybe cause pause to someone reading this on just how they handle their gun. Either by "tossing" it in vehicle seats, the bumpy ride on the four wheeler, the occasional falling off a tree when the gun was stood up against it and hitting the ground. Things of this nature IMHO, contribute to the forces working constantly on the sear surfaces of a mechanically bound (under pressure by spring force etc) of two surfaces under the pressure required to keep said sear engagement surfaces engaged (not firing). Its all a part of the wear and tear no one ever thinks of that in fact actually occurs and eventually depending on design---can minutely over time, cause an eventual fail. WHEW that was a mouthful, sorry for the rant.


A man convinced against his will is NOT convinced.
Speak FACT, not conviction.

A politician is a fellow who will lay down YOUR life for his country.

The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they
try to take it.

-- Thomas Jefferson

#5 glenway

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 01:43 PM

Glad I put a Jewell in mine.



#6 Mo Mo

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 07:09 PM

I had this same thing happen to me on a hunt with a .204 Howa.  It was caused by sear engagement and adjusting the trigger too lite.  A Timney trigger will fix all of this.  It did on mine.  


U.S. Army 1997-2005

 

 


#7 Tgunz64

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 11:54 AM

My dad had the same problem with his 788 in .308. So this has been a problem with Remington for decades. Supposedly they knew about it but did nothing for years. And correct me if I'm wrong but I thought a couple years ago it was brought to light and they ended up paying tens of millions for it. Anyway I bought him a Timney trigger for it and it now works great. I am no longer a fan of Remington and doubt I'll ever own another one.




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